Heroin Addiction

What is Heroin Addiction?

Heroin is classified as an opioid—a drug that interacts with opioid receptors in the nervous system to dull pain. Certain legal drugs, which are frequently used in medical contexts, also fall into this category. Unfortunately, many opioids also have the potential to produce feelings of euphoria when taken, which makes them addictive. This especially is true if the brain is suffering from a preexisting chemical imbalance that needs attending.

Heroin is derived from Morphine, a substance that grows in the seed pods of certain species of the poppy plant. You may recognize Morphine as a drug that doctors use to control pain, but due to its effects on the brain, it also has the potential to cause dependence and addiction. Heroin is no different.

What are the Consequences of Heroin Abuse?

  • Collapsed Veins. Repeated injection of the drug causes severe damage to the circulatory system.
  • Increased risk of contracting HIV and other diseases. Injection needles can be sparse on the streets. Many people who suffer from heroin addiction therefore share, which makes transferring of diseases, such as HIV, possible.
  • Abscesses and infections. Sharing needles can even result in infection of the valves and lining of the heart.
  • Clogged blood vessels. Heroin is frequently combined with other substances, such as starch, sugar, and powdered milk. This is to increase profits for dealers. Unfortunately, repeated injections of these substances has the potential to clog blood vessels, which can damage everything from the liver to the lungs.
  • Mood disorders. Heroin abuse unbalances the chemical ecosystem of the brain. This can lead to life-threatening mental illnesses, such as clinical depression.
  • Loss of brain mass and function. Scientists have found that heroin addiction is associated with a loss of white matter in the brain. White matter is associated with the ability to control one’s impulses, among other things.
  • Failure to fulfill one’s responsibilities. Just as with all drugs, heroin addiction compromises a person’s ability to have a life outside of using. Because so much effort must be expended to keep a steady supply of the drug, those who suffer from heroin addiction often struggle to hold a job or keep steady relationships.

Is there Hope for Full Heroin Recovery?

Addiction ruins lives. This is why the traditional notion that “relapse is a part of the process” is antithetical to full and lasting heroin recovery. Relapse is not a sign of getting better; rather, it is a sign that traditional heroin treatment methods are failing these struggling people.

At Health Recovery Center, we challenge the notion that heroin recovery must be preceded by relapse after relapse. The goal of our heroin treatment is to provide you with lasting heroin recovery, free of the cravings and mood swings that traditional methods fail to address. We facilitate this process through the revolutionary ideology and treatment process of biochemical repair, combined with talk therapy.

We also challenge the notion that heroin addiction is a character flaw or a moral failing. Unlike traditional, twelve-step programs, we focus on empowering the struggling addict, facilitating a recovery that’s free of guilt or shame. Heroin addiction is the result of a very real chemical imbalance in the brain—in other words, the result of a diseased organ. There is no shame in seeking treatment for, say, a disease of the heart; why should the struggling addict be ashamed of seeking treatment for a disease of the brain?

If you’re ready to rid yourself of heroin’s control over your life, give Health Recovery Center a call today at 800-554-9155 for a free consultation. Let us help you find joy again.

Real People with Real Results

One thousand, Two Hundred and Ninety-Three days I have been sober thanks to HRC.

Best Regards,

- M.H.

I came into this program sick, broken, and much stressed! Hopeless!! I feel very confident in my future knowing I have the tools to live healthy physically and emotionally.

T.

Thank you for your kindness, wisdom, and guidance for J. Especially for the extra effort, it appears to be working as he is sleeping better. He even said he had clarity this morning.

- G